Vesicants and Extravasation

These two terms defined by the Infusion Nurses Society means: Vesicant – an agent capable of causing blistering, tissue sloughing or necrosis when it escapes from the intended vascular pathway into surrounding tissue. Extravasation – the inadvertent infiltration of vesicant solution or medication into surrounding tissue. There are several chemotherapeutic agents with vesicant properties, and…

Short Peripheral Catheter Checklist

This great resource in available free to download to INS members from the INS website – SPC  Checklist. SPC means short peripheral catheter, which man y of us call “peripheral IV catheter” or “PIV”. This checklist was part of the IV Safety Task Force position paper project on Recommendations for Improving Safety Practices for Short…

Think Safety, Insert Safely

In June of 2013, I was honored to chair a national task force for the Infusion Nurses Society’s (INS) project on Short Peripheral Catheter Safety (SPC).  Along with five other colleagues, we embarked on a task  to identify the safety and practice issues and  look at ways to promote safety in the insertion and management…

Q&A: PIV and Blood Return

Q: If I don’t get a blood return when checking a PIV for patency before administering an IV, does that make it unsafe to proceed? A: While verification of a blood return on a short peripheral IV is the common way to check for patency, sometimes, it is difficult to obtain a blood return in…

Q&A: Syringe re-use

I get questions from colleagues on social networks, while I don’t post all of the questions , there are times when I do post for learning purposes. Here’s one on “syringe re-use”. Q: It boggles my mind, how someone highly trained, a nurse, can use a single use syringe  over and over and sometimes on multiple patients.…

RNs mixing IV medications

A nurse colleague started a new job as an infusion nurse for a physician office based practice offering infusion services (non chemo) to their patients. After a few days, the nurse left the new job for the following reasons:  Another RN in the office routinely mixes IV medication for the infusion nurses to administer. The IV medication…

In case you are the IV patient…

I have now confirmed my blog readers are not only healthcare providers but are ‘actual’ patients. I get questions/emails/comments from them and they made it known to me that they are watching and noticing what we do to their venous access!!  LOL.. So in the spirit of sharing and learning, without revealing anything about them,…