I got a blood return…but

…it burns when you flush my port! In case you missed it… “The Case of the Painful Port”  a very interesting article published by ONS Connect and  shared by a twitter colleague @ONSmark.  Read article here… This case is a very good reminder for us nurses to stop and listen to what our patients are…

My IV infiltrated….

and I am wondering if what seeped into my arm will yield any medicinal benefit or if it’s like not getting anything at all? This was a question posted by a reader of this blog. Thanks for posting this interesting question.  While I could have readily given an answer based on my experience, I wanted…

Just something to think about…

This maybe old news to some…but others may have missed it… Infiltration: Checking for blood return or back flow of blood is good for patency but not a reliable method for assessing infiltration at IV site. If infusion continues to run when you apply digital pressure 3 inches above peripheral IV site in front of…

Nurse….my IV hurts!!

You just started a PIV in the patient’s right arm and soon after, the patient complained of sharp pain and ask that the PIV be removed. What would you do? Leave PIV in and tell patient,of course it will hurt, I just stuck you with a needle Assess the IV site and if no redness…

Got IV Questions? Get Answers!

Here are replies to questions I received either on twitter or FB. I thought I’d blog about it in the spirit of sharing and learning. “What do you think about using “nitroglycerin” ointment to help find veins for IV starts?” There are literature supporting the use of nitroglycerin ointment for dilating veins prior to venipuncture…

A love affair with all things bloody…

… bloody, as in blood return… which, to an infusion nurse is truly exhilarating! When I am challenged to insert a 24g peripheral IV catheter in a tiny, invisible vein of a dehydrated infant, I jump for joy as I watch anxiously for the blood return and pray that blood continues to backflow as I…

10 Tips for patients on infusion therapy

It is amazing when you meet someone and they find out you are a nurse (infusion nurse), they start asking a lot of health related questions. Honestly, I don’t mind and I am grateful that most people I meet know what “infusion therapy” is,  although a few are still confused that it means…blood draw!!  😦…

Vesicants: not just chemo agents!

There is no doubt that several chemotherapeutic agents have vesicant properties, and when inadvertently infused into the surrounding tissue from an infiltrated IV, these agents may have the potential to cause blisters, severe tissue injury or necrosis, known as extravasation. The damage to the tissue can occur from direct contact with the vesicant medication, from…