Q &A : AC PIVs

Q: I know not to but reality is, many nurses use the AC (antecubital fossa) to start and dwell a peripheral IV. It is the easiest place to find a vein so why not use it? A: The antecubital fossa is in front of the elbow, bounded laterally and medially by the humeral origins of…

Q&A: Medical Assistants and IV therapy

Q: Can medical assistants in office based infusion settings insert peripheral IVs and administer IV medications? A: This is a question I get weekly.  I have posted a previous blog about this topic and replied privately to individuals asking the question. But I think it’s time to post my response again: Medical assistants (MAs)as defined…

Twice is enough…

The practice criteria in the INS standard 35 on vascular access site preparation and device placement states: “No more than 2 attempts at vascular access placement should be made by any 1 nurse, as multiple unsuccessful attempts limit future vascular access, and cause patients unnecessary pain. Patients with difficult vascular access require a careful assessment…

40 years of INS

The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) is celebrating its 40th year as the premier organization for infusion nurses. Through the years, this organization has gone through many changes, a name change from National Intravenous Therapy Association (NITA) , and yes, even the logos. But one thing remains the same, it continues to set the standards for…

PIV Catheter Gauge selection

The goal when selecting the proper gauge of an peripheral IV catheter is to ensure that the best device meets the patient’s needs.  This means taking into consideration many factors such as: Prescribed therapy/type of solution Duration of treatment Peripheral vein availability/vein integrity Diagnosis /Age Known complications of the device The Infusion Nurses Society standards of practice states…

RNs mixing IV medications

A nurse colleague started a new job as an infusion nurse for a physician office based practice offering infusion services (non chemo) to their patients. After a few days, the nurse left the new job for the following reasons:  Another RN in the office routinely mixes IV medication for the infusion nurses to administer. The IV medication…

Cheaper at the Doctor’s Office

I came across this interesting article on a study that shows chemo costs less in doctor’s offices. Chemotherapy Treatment in Hospitals Costs 24% more than Treatment in Physician’s Offices The study found that care for patients treated in a physician’s office is less expensive regardless of the length of the chemotherapy duration. The average chemotherapy…

One of these things is not like the others…

Sounds familiar? Growing up, it’s my favorite Sesame Street segment. At several recent meetings with physician groups and administrators who were getting ready to open up an infusion center, it became very obvious they were confused about the following. 1. An infusion nurse (aka IV nurse) is not the same as a phlebotomist. An infusion nurse…

Welcome 2012…

2011 went by so fast and just like most of you, I can’t believe it’s already 2012. 2011 was a good year f0r me professionally and an equally good year for this blog as well. Through this blog, I have met so many wonderful individuals,  learned so much from them, and very grateful for their…

Two-wah……

Time flies when you’re having fun!!! This week, the Infusion Nurse Blog is celebrating its two year blog anniversary!!! *throws confetti* As I said before and again this year, sometimes I still feel like I don’t have anything interesting to blog about. But I am very encouraged, grateful and honored because you have continued to…