Short Peripheral Catheter Checklist

This great resource in available free to download to INS members from the INS website – SPC  Checklist. SPC means short peripheral catheter, which man y of us call “peripheral IV catheter” or “PIV”. This checklist was part of the IV Safety Task Force position paper project on Recommendations for Improving Safety Practices for Short…

Q&A: PIV and Blood Return

Q: If I don’t get a blood return when checking a PIV for patency before administering an IV, does that make it unsafe to proceed? A: While verification of a blood return on a short peripheral IV is the common way to check for patency, sometimes, it is difficult to obtain a blood return in…

It’s Q&A Time…..

On a regular basis, I get questions from readers and from Twitter colleagues. Here are some of the Q’s and my A’s which I thought I’d blog about it in the spirit of sharing and learning. 1. Vancomycin Q: We give Vancomycin IV on a regular basis through an IV site in the arm at…

Poll Results: Gloves vs no gloves during vein palpation

The poll results are in: 1.  Do you think an RN should wear gloves when palpating for veins prior to venipuncture? Yes:  47 Votes    42% No:  65 Votes     58% 112 readers took the poll, and 58% said they think an RN should not wear gloves when palpating veins prior to venipuncture. 47% said they…

A second look at Midline catheters

Midline catheters have been around since the 1950’s and with the increasing popularity of other venous access like PICCs, many have forgotten about this viable option for venous access. So let’s take a second look… A midline catheter is approximately 3-8 inches long and is inserted in the antecubital area and advanced into the peripheral…

I got a blood return…but

…it burns when you flush my port! In case you missed it… “The Case of the Painful Port”  a very interesting article published by ONS Connect and  shared by a twitter colleague @ONSmark.  Read article here… This case is a very good reminder for us nurses to stop and listen to what our patients are…