Two-wah……

Time flies when you’re having fun!!! This week, the Infusion Nurse Blog is celebrating its two year blog anniversary!!! *throws confetti* As I said before and again this year, sometimes I still feel like I don’t have anything interesting to blog about. But I am very encouraged, grateful and honored because you have continued to…

INS 2011: Exhibit Hall Experience

I am back from the INS 2011 meeting in Louisville  and  although it was exhausting, one can’t say they didn’t learn anything, The week was packed with educational sessions that focused on may different core aspects of infusion nursing. The exhibit hall was packed with vendors and manufacturers eager to showcase their latest and greatest…

The Phlebitis Scale does mean something..

Nurses know that phlebitis is the inflammation of the vein and is considered an adverse patient outcome. Vascular access sites should be routinely assessed for signs and symptoms of phlebitis , as well as the severity of phlebitis. According to the Infusion Nurses Society(INS) Standards of Practice, a standardized scale that is valid, reliable, and…

Survey Results: Standards of Practice

Here are the results of the survey from a  previous post “Take our survey: Standards of Practice”. Q1  Are you aware that there is a Standard of Practice for Infusion Nursing?   n=75 Yes:  82.5%                      No:  17.65% Q2  If you are an RN, LPN or APN performing, administering, delivering IV/infusion therapy, do you think the…

Got IV Questions? Get Answers!

Here are replies to questions I received either on twitter or FB. I thought I’d blog about it in the spirit of sharing and learning. “What do you think about using “nitroglycerin” ointment to help find veins for IV starts?” There are literature supporting the use of nitroglycerin ointment for dilating veins prior to venipuncture…

10 Tips for patients on infusion therapy

It is amazing when you meet someone and they find out you are a nurse (infusion nurse), they start asking a lot of health related questions. Honestly, I don’t mind and I am grateful that most people I meet know what “infusion therapy” is,  although a few are still confused that it means…blood draw!!  😦…

JUST SAY NO….

..…if patients offer their antecubital fossa to you for an IV start. Sad but true, many patients do not understand the difference between blood draw and starting a peripheral IV. We, as registered nurses should understand the difference and know that starting an IV in the antecubital fossa is not good practice. The antecubital fossa…

Phlebitis – the sequeal

This is a follow-up to my previous post “When an infusion nurse gets an IV”. Many have asked about what “phlebitis grade 2” meant. Phlebitis is defined as the inflammation of the vein and is considered an adverse patient outcome. The Infusion Nurses Society’s infusion nursing standards of practice (2006) provides a uniform standard scale…

When an infusion nurse gets an IV.

It is not easy when a nurse is on the receiving end as the patient. Today I had an IV started in my right forearm for an outpatient procedure. Nothing serious, just a screening procedure highly recommended when one reaches a certain birth number. I was a bit anxious but when the pre-op nurse started…